7 thoughts on “Do You Still Believe in ‘Ancient Egypt’? Why?

  • 28-June-2018 at 1:38 pm
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    Great video. The quotes from the researchers are great.

    “When you find out what does it say, you ask, how does it relate to other things. And of course, different things strike different notes in you.”

    “With the papyri, there’s always something new to say. Something that will keep you excited. Something that will never allow you to be bored.”

    They seem to be telling us the true nature of the papyri “work.”

    The claims about what they’ve found are very far-fetched. So much so that it seems clear the “scholars” are “taking the piss.” They are winking and joking and testing to see how much nonsense people are willing to believe.

    (Supposedly they’ve “reconstructed” only 5000 documents, 90% of which are “non-literary in nature,” i.e. bills and inventories and tax forms. But of the 500 documents with literary value found in this one garbage dump in an ancient small town, look how lucky they got in terms of what they “found.”) Here are some of the documents “found.” Surely they are taking the piss!

    The contract of a wrestler agreeing to throw his next match for a fee.
    Various and sundry ancient recipes for treating haemorrhoids, hangovers and cataracts.
    Details of a corn dole mirroring a similar program in the Roman capital.

    The Constitution of the Athenians…written by Aristotle!
    Works of Plato
    Euclid’s The Elements

    A previously unknown play by Sophocles….about Satyrs

    Fragments of Sappho, Greek poet from the island of Lesbos famous for her poems about love.

    A bunch of Old Testament texts

    A bunch of New Testament texts

    etc.

    Heck of a garbage dump! LOL.

    • 28-June-2018 at 11:14 pm
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      I’m glad that others picked up on those little gems from the ‘experts’. Perhaps not quite ‘Freudian slips’ per se, but revealing nonetheless.

      They openly state that they need money to turn these cornflakes into books, and they turn the cornflakes into books for money.

      Nothing wrong with that, in my opinion, but it completely destroys the normie perception that ‘history’ is any different to any other industry.

      You see, the normie operates on the understanding that certain professions exist to do good, and the money is only a corollary of the good.

      Doctors, historians, scientists: these people do what they do to help us. They are noble. Their profession is noble. Their work is noble.

      This is one of the main short-circuits implanted into the normies’ puny little brains to stop them from even thinking about questioning the authorities.

      No, these dudes openly admit that they convert cornflakes into ‘ancient books’ for the money.

      The world is a business, Mr Beale.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yuBe93FMiJc

      What is not quite so obvious, at least to those lacking eyes to see, is what is revealed by the ‘experts’ excitement about their work.

      We like to imagine that these are objective researchers, chiefly concerned with the truth, constantly checking their own premises.

      Nope. These dudes genuinely believe themselves to be detectives, piecing together history in a literal sense.

      Educated morons.

      We saw the exact same thing with the Oxford professor in the Herodotus material.

      https://www.johnlebon.com/member-videos/full-member-video-update-07-3-nov-2017-air-of-authority/

      Once you break from the spell, it is so obvious that these guys are not actually all that bright.

      They were simply the best at rote memorising tales from books, writing essays, kissing ass, and rising through the ranks of academia.

      But listen to them. Listen to how they speak. They are morons.

      If they didn’t have such cushy jobs and social status, I might even feel sorry for them.

      From what I can gather, they are in fact leading pretty good lives. Money. Job security. Respect.

      And they seem (need) to truly believe in what they are doing.

      In a way, I actually envy them.

      Your observation about the great fortune of finding so many different authors of antiquity is a valid one, and well-made.

      What idiot back in ancient history was putting all of this stuff in a rubbish dump? His descendants could be bazillionaires, if he had just put it away in storage instead.

      Now that would make a good episode of Trash Hunters (or whatever the hell they call those moronic programs). You know the ones I’m talking about.

      ‘Well, old chap, it appears you have found a 2,000 year old Aristotle original! This would fetch, I’d dare say, upwards of seven figures, at auction!’

      WATTBA.

      • 18-July-2018 at 7:06 am
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        What idiot back in ancient history was putting all of this stuff in a rubbish dump? His descendants could be bazillionaires, if he had just put it away in storage instead.

        Imagine, 2,000 years from now, a future culture/civilisation “discovering” one of our rubbish dumps, and how they would interpret the findings within.
        “Let’s see… here we have a book that we’ve translated into something called ‘Game of Thrones’. We feel, that based up the information gleaned from this book, we have a fairly accurate assessment of what things were like at that time period. ”

        Let’s go with their silly story, and assume that they actually found these special ‘corn flakes’, and were able to piece them together, translate them, etc.
        Why assume that they are anything more than a pulp fiction story of it’s day? I would say, that the fact that it was found in a rubbish dump, would lend one to believe that it was considered…well… garbage.

    • 29-June-2018 at 5:46 am
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      I’m sure there is a shopping list in there somewhere. The British Academy who funded this project are honest….. right? I mean, they never lie, do they? Who funds the British Academy? https://britac.ac.uk/wolfson-research-professorships and many more like this. I think its all about keeping the Academics happy and paid to keep up with the lies. Would you believe they are still funding research into Ancient Greece and Ancient Egypt… I’m sure there are alot of rubbish dumps there that have not yet been discovered..

  • 28-June-2018 at 1:47 pm
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    The history hoax sometimes seems like an elaborate college prank. Part of an initiation into a fraternity or secret society. Just a giant joke from the Oxford humor magazine. Back in the late 1800s, a small minority went to college, and an even smaller minority went to Oxbridge. The masses assumed these college boys were the best and the brightest. In fact, they were just the richest. And the most audacious. They were to the manor born….to create their own realities. After the first few documents were “accepted,” they just kept going with the joke.

  • 29-June-2018 at 5:50 am
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    Wow. I had listened to your parody song before, but this time I read all the links. Wow. The brass plates story is amazing.

    Bolton was familiar with the Clamper motto: “Credo Quia Absurdum,” which means “I believe because it is absurd.” But the “ECV” lettering had escaped notice, and he did not think of the Clampers.

    It seems like he was in on it. But even if he wasn’t, the fraternity of historians are a bunch of jokers.

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